Re: David Lynch Blu-Ray / 4K / UHD disc tracker

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Maybe. Blue Velvet is owned by MGM, who was just sold to Amazon. I can see where they might be re-claiming the streaming rights for sure for Amazon Prime. But since Amazon has no physical media interests, the question is probably do they see having a physical disc out there competition for streaming or not. If no, then they might renew Criterion's physical media rights.
Just cut them up like regular chickens

Re: David Lynch Blu-Ray / 4K / UHD disc tracker

186
I suspect it'll only be a blu-ray release, but who knows. I saw the new restoration theatrically last month and it certainly didn't really look any better than it did originally. But the sound sucked. At first I thought it was the theater's fault, but I've heard other people mention how bad it is including John Neff. Hopefully they fix that for the new disc.
Just cut them up like regular chickens

Re: David Lynch Blu-Ray / 4K / UHD disc tracker

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klimov wrote: 10/08/22, 05:57:14 Saw some comments on Facebook that the sound is screwed for LH too...
It sounded good in the theater I went to, which is no small feat as their sound usually sucks.

Does anyone actually buy Criterion discs except at the B&N sale (which Amazon always matches)? Unless it's Lynch, I always wait.
Just cut them up like regular chickens

Re: David Lynch Blu-Ray / 4K / UHD disc tracker

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If Criterion do a UK version that'll be cheaper, but there's been no 4K from Criterion in the UK so far (tsk!). With B&N there are shipping charges, so other suppliers like blowitoutofhere and HDWow were comparable or cheaper In the past (and still are the best bet for some labels like Kino). Outside the B&N sale, the best price on a US Criterion from here is probably the UK Amazon site - again, no shipping charges - but you have to wait until after the release date, which is a little bit tedious, and it still ain't cheap.

Have noticed the prices for 4K limited editions getting sillier and sillier - up to £80 for a single film! - but I guess this makes sense in that the consumer base is small and fervent.