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Re: Silicon Valley

Postby TC on 26/05/17, 10:33:33

O-dot wrote:As said on Twitter this week: "Someone ought to pull T.J. Miller aside, then, calmly and slowly, tell him the story of David Caruso."

or anyone other than eddie murphy who left SNL with stars in their eyes.
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Re: Silicon Valley

Postby klimov on 27/05/17, 06:29:57

Surely he had a contract for 6 or 7 seasons? They should've held him to it. As you say, it's only 168 minutes of content a year and he's in no more than half of it. 1 month of work, give or take? Cock.
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Re: Silicon Valley

Postby darkness on 27/05/17, 12:58:28

TC wrote:or anyone other than eddie murphy who left SNL with stars in their eyes.

Yeah, whatever happened to those Bill Murray, Adam Sandler, Will Ferrell, Mike Myers, Tina Fey, Robert Downey Jr., Chevy Chase or Billy Crystal guys after they left the show?

Surely he had a contract for 6 or 7 seasons? They should've held him to it.

Seven years is the typical contract, but it also has built into it points at x amount of years where either party and opt out or renegotiate. My guess is he wanted more money than they were able to pay him. Ratings have been way down this season (about half what they were in previous seasons) so I imagine they felt they couldn't justify paying a huge salary for diminishing returns. Cutting the budget was likely a condition of it returning for another season.
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Re: Silicon Valley

Postby klimov on 27/05/17, 13:27:14

Last season was shit, that's why. Felt like Judge took a back seat, but he was back directing the first two episodes this season which is also totally back on form.
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Re: Silicon Valley

Postby O-dot on 27/05/17, 15:16:44

darkness wrote:Ratings have been way down this season (about half what they were in previous seasons) so I imagine they felt they couldn't justify paying a huge salary for diminishing returns.


In the show's defense, it had Game of Thrones as a lead-in previously and could count on some of that audience sticking around.
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Re: Silicon Valley

Postby TC on 28/05/17, 07:49:39

darkness wrote:
TC wrote:or anyone other than eddie murphy who left SNL with stars in their eyes.

Yeah, whatever happened to those Bill Murray, Adam Sandler, Will Ferrell, Mike Myers, Tina Fey, Robert Downey Jr., Chevy Chase or Billy Crystal guys after they left the show?

yeah i didn't mention everyone, but in the big scheme of cast members that left thinking they would have a movie career, odds are against it.
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Re: Silicon Valley

Postby darkness on 26/06/17, 00:33:44

Hollywood Reporter wrote:T.J. Miller Says Leaving 'Silicon Valley' "Felt Like a Breakup"

JUNE 25, 2017 7:30pm PT by Bryn Elise Sandberg

The actor who plays Erlich says he turned down the reduced season 5 role HBO offered him: "They didn’t imagine that I would be in a position of being like, 'I think that’s it.'"

Sunday's season finale of Silicon Valley marked the end of the road for Erlich Bachman.

The HBO comedy wrote out T.J. Miller's fan-favorite character in a rather unexpected and unceremonious fashion. After going to China to meet up with Gavin Belson (Matt Ross), the pair stop at an opium den in Tibet, where Erlich gets so high that he can barely function. So the outed Hooli CEO pays the owner of the drug den a wad of crash to keep Erlich there for five years.

And with that, Silicon Valley said goodbye to one of its most beloved characters. HBO first confirmed that Miller would not be coming back for the upcoming fifth season in May, writing in a statement that "the producers of Silicon Valley and T.J. Miller have mutually agreed that T.J. will not return for season 5." The news left many wondering why there was a sudden parting, particularly since Erlich has been one of the show's biggest breakouts.

In a separate interview with The Hollywood Reporter ahead of the season 4 finale, co-showrunner Mike Judge offered a bit more clarity on Miller's exit. "It was kind of becoming clear that he didn't want to do the show anymore, but we wanted to leave it so that there would an opportunity to come back at some point, " he said, explaining that the writers purposely left Erlich's storyline open-ended in the finale. "When the season was done, we talked to T.J. and said, 'Do you want to come back for part of it?' And he just wanted to move on."

Judge added that the producers intended to give Miller an out if he wanted to take it. "I think if somebody doesn't want to do it, you don't want to force them to. I certainly don't," said the executive producer, who also spoke with THR about the trajectory of the season and his six-season plan for the comedy. "It also wouldn't make for a very good work environment."

Now, Miller is offering his side of the story. In a wide-ranging and, at times, eccentric interview (what else do you expect from Miller?), the actor reveals that HBO offered him a reduced role in the upcoming season, which he ultimately turned down in favor of leaving the show completely. He gets candid on why he ultimately walked away from the series, on whether he'll return to Silicon Valley in the future and why exiting the comedy "felt like a breakup."

How did you manage to leave the show mid-run? Didn't you have a contract that would keep you on the series?

They came to me and said, “Look, we’re not going to pick up your contingency because we want to offer you doing five episodes out of the ten, or three episodes.” And then when I said, “Oh perfect, I had been wanting to ask if you guys would open to me leaving the show.” And then they suddenly said, “Wait, no, what? You can do whatever. What? What do you mean?” And that was so good of them. They said, “Look, we wanted to reduce ... We just wanted you to have more time to do all of the things you’re doing.” And I said, “Well, the best way for me to be involved in the show is by no longer being on it.” I swear to god, that’s why the internet broke. Everybody was like, “What the f— are you talking about? You’re on this successful show. Don’t you want three more years of solid acting work and don’t you want to be a famous television actor?” And I was like, “No, not really.” I’d like to parasail into the Cannes Film Festival for The Emoji Movie because that’s the next new funny thing that will make people laugh.

Why were the producers going to reduce your role in the first place?

Because they had to move the production schedule around. That’s how heavy-duty my schedule is. Even the most successful comedy next to Veep on HBO was like this thing that I had to … I’m doing stand-up and I come back and I didn’t sleep at all. I was incredibly busy. People joke about it but I’m the hardest-working man in show business, maybe. So they were like, “Let’s make this easier for both of us.” And I was like, “I think this is an amazing opportunity.”

Why was leaving Erlich in a Tibetan drug house the right ending for your character?

I just thought it was so funny. They’d written a potential exit — an organic exit — and I just thought it was so funny. I also think it’s interesting to leave a comedy at its height, one that is known for being cyclical. Everybody sort of criticizes [that part of it]. The only thing that you can talk down about the show and about Alec Berg, the showrunner for the first couple years, is that it’s cyclical. If they fail, then they succeed, and then if they succeed, they fail. It’s over and over. That’s an old type of sitcom. That’s Seinfeld, where Alec Berg used to work. It’s recycling, it’s network. This is HBO. And so I thought, what if suddenly the whole thing changed? Where’s the guy at the house? He’s gone. Richard [Thomas Middleditch] doesn’t have a foil. Jian Yang [Jimmy O. Yang] comes to prominence. All these other characters will change and grow. I read something today that I thought was really sweet, which was that Erlich as a character never really belonged. I mean, really think about that.

You don't think Erlich belonged in the show?

Yeah, nobody likes him. He doesn’t have any friends. His only friend is Jian Yang, and Jian Yang f—ing hates him. I mean, he calls him a “fat loser.” You don’t say that to a friend. Erlich is just the person nobody wants. ... There’s no reason for him to be there. He’s conned his way into the whole situation. And so I thought it would be really interesting if suddenly they were able to rid themselves of him. If they had truly had enough of him, which is what they’re always saying, then why wouldn’t he just exit? What if they’re really suddenly like, he’s gone? Now what? Who does Richard have to complain about? Who is f—king up their situation? Where is that confidence in the show? Where is that blowhard that everybody needs? Who is able to be negging without Thomas Middleditch being like, “I’ll kill you, you little slut.” So that all interested me and most of all it made me laugh really hard. That was the impetus behind walking. That’s sort of the impetus behind everything I do, it just makes me laugh. It’s not about money, it’s not about any of that stuff. It’s certainly not about fame, which is destructing my relationships with my family. It’s about things that are interesting and funny. That’s what we need right now in a post-religious, post-meaning society.

You mentioned your schedule is crazy. How much of it was about that?

I was sick of telling my wife in earnest, “I’m going to slow down the schedule. We’ll have more time to spend in New York.” And even when I thought of leaving, she said, “Look, man, this is a character people love. They feel like they’re friends with him.” And although that makes for a terrible time at the airport because everybody high-fives me, grabbing your ass on the way to your f—ing plane to Omaha, Nebraska, to do standup comedy — these people want to know, “Do you really want to walk from what many would say is the cushiest situation in television? The platinum age of television.” And I said, “Yeah, I think that would be really interesting.” If you’re going to be unsafe and unstable ... then let’s see what happens.

If you wanted Erlich to be essential to the group, did you have any conversations with the showrunners, Mike Judge or Alec Berg, about possibly moving in that direction?

No, because that was the joke. He never was supposed to be present. I actually think the writing with Erlich gets funnier and funnier the more inessential and irrelevant he becomes. He’s an annoyance. He was an obstacle to this beautiful, perfect thing that all of these people around him were going to create. ... I didn’t talk to Alec because I don’t like Alec, but I think Mike Judge and Clay Tarver are brilliant. Both of them were so accommodating, saying, “Well, what if you just do three episodes?” or, “What if you just did the season finale?” … Mike’s idea was this Silk Road, Darknet storyline with Jian Yang and Erlich, and I loved that because I love Jian Yang. We’re really like Laurel and Hardy. It’s so funny. … But I just thought that what the show has suffered from, what’s bad about it, is that Richard is the CEO and then he isn’t but then he finds his way back to be CEO, and then once he finds his way back to being the CEO he says he doesn’t want to be the CEO, and it’s just the same thing over and over. … So I thought it would be really interesting [to leave]. And I don’t know if they anticipated that or if it was yet another cliffhanger, something to be solved in the first episode of season five. But for me, television, unlike women and wine, does not get better with age. So I thought, “Wouldn’t it be interesting to leave at the height of the success of the show?” Knowing that Kumail [Nanjiani] is brilliant, Zach Woods is the greatest improviser alive, Thomas Middleditch is one of the funniest people of all, Martin Starr is the deadpan comedian of our generation, what if I just stepped aside and let them continue the show and see what it becomes? I think that they made room for me to exit without ever really believing that I would walk away from the show. … I think they thought I was a television actor and not a comedian.

What do you mean you're not an actor?

I’m not an actor; I’m a comedian. And I don’t know how the f— I hoodwinked Hollywood into giving me a career in this. But I’m not sitting here saying, “I need more lines. I’m not funny enough.” I’m not Thomas Middleditch. I’m me, the guy that thinks all of this is sort of ridiculous. It was a joke. Leaving was a joke that I thought would be a good joke because the show would grow and change. It seemed like a funny trick to play on everyone. It’s just like, what if Kramer [Michael Richards] left in the middle of Seinfeld’s height? And also what if that guy never said the n-word on a stage? What if that was the end of this character? I just thought that would be really fascinating. The response to my departure was really f—king …. there’s really no other way to say it: It was just really heartwarming. It’s like, wow, I guess I really did make something that people really dug. Just like Fred from Big Hero 6 or Weasel [from Deadpool.]

Speaking of the fan response, what do you say to viewers who think they might not enjoy the show as much without you in it?

Christopher Evan Welch, who was 10 times funnier than I am, died. They lost someone to eternity who was much funnier than my character and the show found a way to pivot and find its way. Erlich failed to prove to be meaningful or of any value to Pied Piper, and so he pivoted. That’s what every company in Silicon Valley does. That’s what America is. There is failure, but we pivot. ... My departure will do the same. Instead of dying, like everybody in my family would love, I go and make The Emoji Movie. It’s worse for American culture.

Your character was such a fan favorite…

I would argue that I think Jared is funnier.

Sure, but Erlich was iconic out of the gate and news of your exit spawned headlines like, “Is Silicon Valley Really Silicon Valley Without Erlich Bachman?”

Well, that’s sort of what we’re talking about. … A lot of people are writing really interesting stuff about like, “Well, what does happen now?” And I love that. I want to step aside. Thomas Middleditch has always wanted to be a star. He’s always wanted to be the star of the show. So I thought, really it’s an ensemble show and if I step aside, the ensemble will each have a little more room. I guess some people are like, “Ah, I guess he’s got too much going on, he’s too big for the show.” What are you talking about? It’s, like, the best show on television, in my opinion, and I’m going and doing The Emoji Movie — and you can publish that because Sony knows we down to get motherf—ing paid globally. But I want to make movies for children. I want to have a schedule where I can have a fun, healthy relationship where we have lazy days. I also want to be the voiceover of How to Train Your Dragon theme parks. I’m doing a lot as a public servant and jester to the American public. As Kristen Stewart always says, “It’s worldwide. It’s worldwide.” I feel like this is just an interesting thing to do and I think if you’re a fan, you’re going to continue to be a fan — and I’ll continue to work for you.

What were those final conversations with the network like?

It felt like a breakup with HBO. The final phone call was them going like, “Well, I don’t think this is the end of Erlich. I still want to see him on television,” and I was like, “I know but I think this is for the best." HBO has never treated me as an employee, always as a collaborator. They were understanding and said, “Look, if you really think that this is the move and that you’ll be able to produce an hour special for us sooner than you would have if you were on the show and if you feel right now under the current administration that you need to do standup because you need to be talking to the American public, then we support that." … So they were very, very cool about it, and that final conversation was super friendly and sad. It was heartbreaking on my end.

Would you come back to the show even just for one episode?

[HBO programming president] Casey [Bloys] called me and said, “Hey, when do we start season five? Just kidding. Listen, we love that you’re doing a special with us. I just wanted to check in.” So I would love to work with them forever. It’s just that I will never be on Silicon Valley again. That character, as you have seen, disappeared into the ether. And he did it at a time when no one was sick of him, when he had worn thin but not worn out. And even my father when I told him that I was leaving was like, “Yeah, we watched three or four episodes in a row and it’s kind of one-note. I think it’s a good idea.” So I had the perfect father-son moment with him going, “Yeah, it’s starting to kind of suck. It’s a little stale. You’re becoming a bit hack.” If I can trust anyone in terms of comedy, it’s my father. I thought this is definitely a good idea if he’s saying, “I’m getting sick of watching you. Why don’t you do something else?”

You could change your mind though, right?

No, I don’t know if you’ve seen my work but I don’t particularly flounder and flip-flop on stuff. It’s all pretty mediocre but delivered with a very solid fist, just like Erlich. Mike said, “We can do less episodes and a storyline just with you and Jian Yang.” And then Clay Tarver was like, “Just do the show. What are you doing? Do the show, it’s a fun show! You’re great on it. Just make my life easier and do it!” I’ve been so lucky to work with them. Mike was truly was like, “I guess I understand that the show can only change and grow and get better from here.” By the end of the call, he very much like, “Yes, I think this is a good place to sort of place the finale of Erlich.” That’s because they’re really funny and they get it.

How did the other cast members take the news of your departure?

This is where the publicist is supposed to step in and go, “Next question.” But to be very frank ... each of them took it a different way, and I think that has to do with their situation contextually. ... Some people, like Kumail, congratulated me and said, “This is fantastic. In some ways, I would do the same, but I think it’s an interesting move. It’s great.” Some people like Zach Woods — who’s very neurotic and never reads the press so it doesn’t matter what you say about him in it — is such a sweetheart and somehow needs to make this [about] having a slow or healthier schedule overall. And then I think Martin Starr is a f—ing chanting Buddhist just like my wife, who’s like, “Cool, man. … This is life. It doesn’t matter. There’s no anything to it.” So that was really, really nice too. But the first person I called when I decided, and all my agents were like, “What are you doing?” — once everybody had said, “OK, OK, this is actually going to be good” — I called Jimmy O. Yang and I said, “Look, man, I’m leaving the show … We’ve cultivated this double act that is so strong and I think you’re the thing that I’m going to miss the most about the show.”

Don't you feel like Erlich deserved a little more closure than he got?

I think that HBO and Alec Berg, specifically, kind of thought — and I guess apparently Thomas Middleditch — I guess they thought, "Alright, maybe this is the end of the character. But like everything in the show, we’ll sort of solve this and then it’s back to normal." And they just didn’t imagine that I would be in a position of being like, “I think that’s it.” … I don’t know how smart [Alec] is. He went to Harvard, and we all know those kids are f—ing idiots. That Crimson trash. Those comedy writers in Hollywood are f—ing Harvard graduates and that’s why they’re smug as a bug. … I think that in television you usually have one element that is very challenging, very frustrating. It’s an obstacle, right? So you’re doing the best work that you can do. Alec was that for me, and I think I was that for Alec. And a very good article was written that says that Erlich in the show is just this constant annoyance to Richard. ... And I think in some ways, that is analogous to real life. I think in some ways Thomas Middleditch is … we have a contrarian relationship, like a big brother-little brother relationship. And this is also an opportunity for me to be like, “Let me just step off, dude. Like, just do your f—ing thing. You’re amazing.” I did a two-man improv show with him for a decade. He’s amazing.

Will you watch the show going forward?

Oh, I don’t watch the show now because I don’t have time. I’m making comedy for people to laugh because their life is essentially tragic. I mean, I’m a fan of the show. I will be forever. If I have a terrible day, I’ll probably tune in to see what Zach Woods said on an episode because you know he’s a winner.

So, what's next for you?

In a world where the culture is fractured, and there is no real zeitgeist, everybody has to work on different platforms — multiple, or in my case, all of them. And I can’t devote enough time to stand up. The people from the show and the fans that get it, they’re like, “We understand. You need to have a slower schedule and divert your focus.” Like The Gorburger Show, standup, Deadpool and is there a Weasel spin-off that’s funny and ironic other than being a sidekick? I have a movie at DreamWorks. And then the people that don’t are like stupid f—king websites like TV Over Mind or something, and they’re putting forth very reasonable, well-written logic for why this is so dumb and the only thing I’ll ever be good at was this part in Silicon Valley.” Yet none of them have seen Yogi Bear 3D, so they’re all talking and chit-chattering and squawk, squawk, squawk — but none of them have seen Yogi Bear 3D. So they don’t know that I’ve already done the best thing that I’ll ever do. And because of that, there is no fear about any move in Hollywood for me. I’m just on the downslope. This is all a downward spiral, career-wise.

This interview has been edited and condensed for clarity.


"Hollywood Reporter wrote:'Silicon Valley's' Mike Judge Talks Season 4 Finale, the End of Erlich and Six-Season Plan
JUNE 25, 2017 7:30pm PT by Bryn Elise Sandberg

The showrunner also discusses Zach Woods' breakout season, Uber's recent saga and the challenges of putting together a fake tech conference.
The fourth season of Silicon Valley ended with a rare win for Pied Piper.

After an uphill battle that involved patent trolls, exploding phones and explicit smart fridges, Richard Hendricks (Thomas Middleditch) and the rest of the gang have finally cleared some major obstacles on their path to creating a new, decentralized version of the internet.

"It's really fun to watch these guys scramble and fail, but it's also fun to watch them succeed," says Mike Judge, who serves as the showrunner on the HBO comedy alongside Alec Berg. "At some point, we just thought that we should figure out what they're going to pivot to, and that really big play would take them to the end of the series."

The episode also marked the end of the road for T.J. Miller's character, Erlich Bachman, following last month's news that the actor would not be returning to the show's fifth season. In the end, Erlich was left in an drug house in Tibet with enough money to keep him there for at least five years.

Ahead of the season finale, The Hollywood Reporter caught up with Judge to talk about Richard's deteriorating moral compass, why this has been Zach Woods' breakout season and his endgame for the series.

What made you want to end the season the way you did with the guys actually winning for once?

At the beginning of the season, we started thinking that maybe we shouldn't have them fail and pivot again to something else. On one hand, I think it's really fun to watch these guys scramble and fail — but it's also fun to watch them succeed. At some point, we just thought that we should figure out what they're going to pivot to, and that really big play would take them to the end of the series. That's the plan anyway.

How did the idea for Hooli-Con come together?

That's something that we've talked about doing in both season two and three. We're been talking about having one of those giant tech conferences like Dreamforce and CES of our own for a while, and we finally found a way to make it work with what they were doing so that it was organic to the story.

How difficult was building an entirely fake tech conference?

All the companies that you see in there except for the ones that are characters are real. We got people to volunteer to come and just set up their stuff in order to be in the show and be seen. I think they thought it would be fun — but one of the challenges was that these are people with some very successful tech companies and I think they're not used to be told by an AD [assistant director] to be quiet and to stand there all day long or to move their mouth but not make a noise. And ADs are used to very obedient extras. It was a little awkward. A lot of these companies are successful tech people and suddenly it's like, "No, don't stand there. Be quiet." [Laughs.] And they don't really care if they don't ever work as an extra again. They were all really nice, it was just kind of funny to watch. It's a very different dynamic than you typically have on a set in L.A.

We've seen Richard evolve over the course of the show's four seasons on the air. What made you want to test his moral limits?

There has been a Breaking Bad element to this season. I think what happens to him is what I've seen happen in Hollywood, actually. You see it with somebody like a head of network. For example, I know Judy McGrath got into what she did when she ran MTV all those years because she's a true music fan and loved what she was doing — but in order to stay in power, you have to start doing stuff that is not true to your inner music fan. If you just refuse to compromise, you get fired and somebody else takes over and it's even worse. I think that's where Richard is at. If he's too nice, he's going to lose control over this whole thing. In his mind, he can do more good than bad by shaking hands with the devil a little bit, and I think that's what makes it interesting for the rest of the series is how far is he willing to go down the dark path in order to ultimately make things better and build this internet that he thinks could be good for mankind?

One character that has really shined this season is Jared, played by Zach Woods. Did you anticipate this season being the breakout it has been for him?

If you ask anyone on the show including the actors, "Who is your favorite?" Zach comes up a lot. I think most of the main cast would probably say that. It's funny, for the first couple seasons, Zach was improvising a lot of stuff about his dark past and his dark childhood and foster care. And I usually cut most of it — not because I didn't think it was right for the character or because I didn't think it was funny — but for other reasons it didn't fit. Then we started finding ways to make it really work where it was organic to the scene. So a lot of that really did come from Zach himself. He's a brilliant performer and just a brilliant comedian. It's been really fun to write for him. On the page, he's kind of the moral center, but seeing him doing it just took it to another level. It was better than I even thought I could be. I think this season finale might be my favorite episode so far. Zach is just so good.

How'd you come up with the idea to have Jack Barker (Stephen Tobolowsky) get kidnapped in a Chinese factory?

That's another thing that we'd be wanting to do for a while. That actually really happened to a CEO, though he was going there to lay off a bunch of people and they held him hostage. I studied that and shot it the same way where he was looking through those bars. The guy wasn't armed but there was something funny about it. In the writers room, we just kept watching it and there was something funny about it because it was a kind of passive-aggressive kidnapping. There weren't any guns; it was just like, "There's 5,000 of us and one of you, and you're not getting out of the building."

HBO confirmed last month that T.J. Miller wouldn't be returning for the show's fifth season. How did you decide to write him out the way you did?

It was kind of becoming clear that he didn't want to do the show anymore, but we wanted to leave it so that there would an opportunity to come back at some point. And so we just talked about how to do that. We had already written the part about Gavin going off to a monastery. ... So we thought, maybe we have Erlich go look for him. And then when the season was done, we talked to T.J. and said, "Do you want to come back for part of it?" And he just wanted to move on. We wanted to give him an out if he wanted to go.

So could he could back for even just one scene next season? Or is this the last we'll see Miller in the show?

That I don't know for sure, but that's probably the last [you'll see him]. Down the road, if there's a season six, I don't know. You never know. But that's the last for a while at least.

As a core castmember and series regular on the show, didn't Miller have a contract? Are you willing to allow an actor to break it if he really wants out?

That would be HBO's [area]. I don't know what the contracts are. But I think if somebody doesn't want to do it, you don't want to force them to. I certainly don't. That's what I said. I don't take any pleasure in making people do something they don't want to do. I think some bosses do, but I don't. It also wouldn't make for a very good work environment.

How do you plan to fill the void left by Erlich moving forward?

We've talked a little bit about it. We start writing the next season on Monday. A lot of times in the writing, it's almost a struggle because we have a lot of characters in the show and a lot of good ones. I'll certainly miss having him in the show. I don't think we're going to say, "Hey, here's a new character to replace him," or anything like that. New characters come along. The tech world is so rich with weird characters. I think we still have more characters we can still pull out of the bag. But I also think we can do a lot more with Suzanne Cryer's character and certainly Zach and Jian Yang. I'm actually looking forward. I think we can shake things up in a way.

You also recently added Haley Joel Osment, who plays a virtual reality wunderkind. Will he be back next year?

Oh right, that's another. We'd certainly like to have him back. We haven't figured out how yet because we haven't started writing, but we all really liked working with him. I wouldn't look at that as someone who replaces Erlich because there's a very different energy to him, but I really like that character and VR is a huge thing in the tech world so it makes sense with that, too.

Presumably, you've been following the recent Uber saga. Could that provide fodder for a season 5 plot?

We had written most of last season when that started to go on so it didn't really make its way in there, but that certainly seems like something we can look into. There's other stories that we've heard, not about Uber, but just in general about douchebag, sexist VCs. There's at least one or two that I've heard that still haven't made their way into the show. I think it will more likely be in that area based on something that wasn't in the newspaper. But I'm sure we'll find a way.

You've said before that you're aiming for a six-season run, so are you viewing this next one as the penultimate season?

Season five would be the second-to-last, yeah. That's how we were talking about when we were setting up this season finale, just to help us in the writing. But you never know. It could be that it gets to six and someone has some idea.

And do you know exactly how you want to end Silicon Valley?

Yeah, we have a series finale, a place ahead that we've talked about for a while now just amongst ourselves. That's how we're thinking of it.
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Re: Silicon Valley

Postby TC on 26/06/17, 08:39:30

yeah i heard an interview with him on jim & sam and he said essentially some of the same things. seems like a good dude that really wants to do stand-up and be with his girl. balls, he's got 'em that's for sure.
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Re: Silicon Valley

Postby klimov on 28/06/17, 03:37:25

Almost Gallo-esque :) Does raise the question why Berg has so much power on the show, Judge should be running things. May explain the dip in quality last season. This season was good, though.
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Re: Silicon Valley

Postby TC on 28/06/17, 08:58:16

just watched the finale last night. the show will be fine. can't wait.
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Re: Silicon Valley

Postby darkness on 31/05/19, 17:17:13

TVLine wrote:HBO's Silicon Valley Confirmed to End With Delayed Season 6

HBO’s Silicon Valley is officially ready to Command-Q.

Confirming nearly seven months of speculation, the pay cabler announced on Friday that the comedy’s delayed, seven-episode Season 6 will be its last. Currently in pre-production, the series is slated to return to HBO later this year.

“Silicon Valley has been a career and life highlight for us,” showrunners Mike Judge and Alec Berg said in a statement. “We’ll miss it desperately, but we’ve always let Pied Piper’s journey guide the way, and Season 6 seems to be the fitting conclusion. We are forever indebted to our incredible cast, crew, and partners at HBO. At a certain point, there’s only so much we can do to make the world a better place.”

Back in November — six months after its Season 5 finale aired — TVLine reported that production on Season 6 had been delayed until Summer 2019. An HBO spokesperson at the time confirmed the postponement, citing Berg’s busy schedule as the reason. “As Alec is a showrunner on both Barry and Silicon Valley, the schedule was structured to allow Alec to wrap on Barry before starting work on Silicon Valley.”

Says HBO programming EVP Amy Gravitt, “It’s been quite a ride since the pilot, when Richard Hendricks’ algorithm first caught the eye of Peter Gregory and Gavin Belson. In the meantime, our culture’s entire relationship with technology has been transformed, and Alec and Mike’s meticulous storytelling has managed to stay ahead of it every step of the way….. Silicon Valley is just the beginning of many more collaborations with these hilarious writers and performers, as well as our standout crew.”

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Re: Silicon Valley

Postby TC on 01/06/19, 06:56:50

yeah that is probably right i guess. but, they also canceled problem areas, which fucking blows. show is great.
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